Commentary of the poem stopping by

Frost considered himself a "lone wolf" in the world of poetry because he did not follow any literary movements. For example, in the third stanza, queer,near, and year all rhyme, but lake rhymes with shake,mistake, and flake in the following stanza.

From a simple poem, many thoughts can result from speculation about why the man stopped in the first place to how he finally snapped out of his obvious trance as he observed the beauty of the scene.

Each choice opens up many doors and together they shape our life. One is tempted to read it, nod quietly in recognition of its splendor and multivalent meaning, and just move on. What the Horse Thinks My little horse must think it queer To stop without a farmhouse near Between the woods and frozen lake The darkest evening of the year.

We make choices throughout our lives, some change our lives for the better whereas some for the worse.

Robert Frost's

The couple, however, went on to have four more children, each of which suffered from mental illness to suicide. It is certainly winter, we know from the snow and cold, but darkest could just mean that, deep into the night, dark as ever.

Or is it the speaker who really thinks it odd and therefore projects his thoughts onto the horse? In effect, this is one long sentence, the syntax unbroken by punctuation. Historical Perspective Most poem readers would take the poem at face-value, disregarding its poetic composition, rhyming and ideas asserted.

The poet may mean that we should not pay heed to those outward temptations. Truly, the woods are dark and enchanting in their own right, yet they can also be merciless. American Publisher, Henry Holt, picked up Frost's earlier books, and then come out with his third, Mountain Interval, a collection that had been written while Frost was still residing in England.

If the owner could see him, would he not stop? For those unfamiliar, New Hampshire is a very long poem, one that took Frost many hours to write. More Analysis Lines 9 - 12 The horse is uncertain, it shakes the bells on the harness, reminding the rider that this whole business - stopping by the woods - is a tad disturbing.

But with line 13, the reader learns that the speaker simply thinks the woods are "lovely, dark and deep. It's as if the speaker is sitting close by, thinking out loud, perhaps whispering. One needs to make these choices and move on in life. He also spent most summers teaching English at Middlebury College in Vermont.

The poet indicates his horse as being a domesticated animal, surprised at this strange stoppage amid the snowy woods. He is contemplating to stay put in the woods, maybe, heralding his death, and freeing his soul from the materialistic world.

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening Summary

More Analysis Lines 9 - 12 The horse is uncertain, it shakes the bells on the harness, reminding the rider that this whole business - stopping by the woods - is a tad disturbing. The crux of the poem lies in the conflict in a moment of solace vs. The narrator is definitely spell-bounded by the momentary distraction from worldly responsibilities, allowing himself a moment of peace.

Then the speaker suddenly seems to be brought back to the scene by noticing that the only other sound he Commentary of the poem stopping by beside the horse's harness is the soft wind and flakes of snow whirling about him.

The poem is rich in its use of figures of speech like imagery, alliteration and personification. Analysis of Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening has four stanzas, all quatrains of iambic tetrameter, that is, each line has four beats, stressed syllables, maintaining a regular rhythm within the poem, perhaps suggesting the plod of a slow moving horse.

It is this ambiguity that keeps the poem fresh. Thus, Robert's farming phase commenced as he attempted to farm the land and continue his writing. Commentary This is a poem to be marveled at and taken for granted. Frost was treated to the delicious situation of having the same journals, such as The Atlantic, soliciting his work, even though they had rejected that same work a couple of years earlier.

The speaker is stopping by some woods on a snowy evening. He gives his harness bells a shake To ask if there is some mistake. They ought to be moving ahead; there's something about the way this person is fixed on the woods that worries the horse, apart from the cold and dark. The rhythm of each line is steady, without variation, and there is nothing odd about it at all.

The woods are blanketed in thick snow, amplifying its beauty factor. The diction of the poem is fairly simple and vivid, thereby resulting in better understanding of the poem. But the reason remains wide open to interpretation from the most simple to the most sinister.

The third line does not, but it sets up the rhymes for the next stanza. All the respective verses conform to the a-a-b-a rhyming scheme.The poem, Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening, explores the motivations of the poet, the inherent moods of the narrator and his fixation with woods for an inner reason.

A maestro of rhyming within conforms, Robert Frost is known as a ‘regional poet’. “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” Commentary. This is a poem to be marveled at and taken for granted. Like a big stone, like a body of water, like a strong economy, however it was forged it seems that, once made, it has always been there.

Frost claimed that he wrote it in a single nighttime sitting; it just came to him. Stopping by the Woods On A Snowy Evening, Commentary This poem was composed by Robert frost in It is narrative in style and consists of four stanzas, each stanza having four lines.

Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost

Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening is a well known Frost classic. Published in it quickly became a poem to keep in memory and although many people know the words by heart, interpretation isn't quite as straightforward. Robert Frost, when asked if the poem had anything to do with death or.

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening By Robert Frost To stop without a farmhouse near Source: Collected Poems, Prose, & Plays (Library of America, ) More About this Poem. Related; collection.

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening: Summary

Common Core State Standards Text Exemplars. Poems to integrate into your English Language Arts classroom. Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening is a well known Frost classic. Published in it quickly became a poem to keep in memory and although many people know the words by heart, interpretation isn't quite as straightforward.

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Commentary of the poem stopping by
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